Robin Van Driel , M.Sc., CIH, ROH, CRSP

Robin Van Driel , M.Sc., CIH, ROH, CRSP

The CIH Credential has helped me soar, and has helped me achieve a new, satisfying career! The value of the having the CIH designation started with a 25% raise effective the day after I told my manager that I had passed the exam. At the time I was working for a mid-sized consulting firm that was primarily into engineering projects but there was a small division for occupational and environmental hygiene work. I heard from others around the office who were present when my manager first found out I had passed that he was bouncing off the walls as this meant we would able to bid for an overseas project in Abu Dubai. The request for proposals did require that a CIH be involved as a member of the team to analyze air quality exposure modeling data to conduct a health risk assessment of the population residing around nearby oil facilities. This was the most unique and interesting special project that I have ever had the opportunity to work on, which would not have been possible without the CIH designation that I obtained in May 2010. That same year I was also able to use the CIH designation to take advantage of obtaining the Canadian registration for occupational hygienists via the National Accreditation Recognition (NAR) process. For anyone not already aware of the NAR process, you get to bypass taking any written exams if you have the CIH certification from ABIH. Approximately one year later, in August 2011, I got the job of my dreams working for our provincial regulatory agency, where I am currently employed. Although it is not a mandatory requirement to be a CIH to hold this position, it is certainly preferred and studying for the CIH prepped me for passing the technical recruitment exams to get my foot in the door for the interview process. Now that I am in this position there is no other place that would rather be. I am completely satisfied with the work I do today. I feel it does make a difference in the quality of life for the workforce in my province. A few days ago a co-worker of mine asked me if I had any pictures that showed workers at risk of potential injury or illness. After searching through my files I realized that each of those hazardous “before” photographs no longer exists. That put a smile on my face to see how much of an impact we can make on improving the likelihood that someone will go home free of illness and in one piece back to their families, the “after” picture that often goes unnoticed and can be taken for granted. Having the CIH initials after my name does give me that little extra confidence when I am dealing with various employers, consultants or workers on challenging issues or complicated scenarios. I feel it also gives others who I am dealing with the peace of mind that they are working with someone who has the experience and knowledge in the work that I do.